Federal Government must do more for growing population of ageing Australians

GREY POWER article in Courier Mail QWeekend, October 1-2,2016 By GRANTLEE KIEZA

It’s high noon in Canberra as Everald Compton gets ready to march toward the microphone and into ­battle at the National Press Club. A few weeks short of his 85th birthday, he’s still hitting his stride. As Compton adjusts his blue and white diamond-­patterned tie, straightens the jacket of his dark blue power suit and runs a hand over his shining white hair, there’s a touch of the statesman about him.

He is a veteran campaigner who has been shaking the hands of prime ministers since 1956 and twisting their arms for the past 40 years, fighting for increases in the pension and spreading his message that grey is gold – that elderly Australians are a priceless asset.

Of all the prime ministers he has met, Bob Menzies and Gough Whitlam were the most commanding, while at the other end of the spectrum he thought Billy McMahon was a “silly little bloke” – the worst prime minister he had ­encountered until he met Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott.

He hopes to channel some of Menzies and Gough today. Watching on, the moderator at the Press Club address, David Speers, Sky Channel’s political editor, remarks: “When Everald Compton is on the warpath, both sides of politics need to watch out.”
Compton casts an eye over the lunchtime audience in the large dining room and as he takes centre stage behind the lectern and adjusts the discreet hearing aid in his left ear, he outlines the reasons why Malcolm Turnbull not only has to appoint a special minister for ageing Australians but why the whole age pension system needs overhauling. There are 1.5 million aged pensioners in Australia, he says, and a third of them are living on or below the ­poverty line, mashing their food because they can’t afford dental care or missing meals so they can pay their rent.
“The age pension in Australia is clearly inadequate,” he says, “and the Government of Australia has to face up to it.”

He holds up a report labelled “The Adequacy of the Age Pension in Australia” that he and a team of researchers have been working on for 12 months. He says it should have been titled “The Inadequacy of the Age Pension”.
Back in 1908, Compton says, Alfred Deakin and Andrew Fisher, who both served as prime ministers that year, “got together and set the age for the pension at 65 because that’s the age when they reckoned most people would be dead, and they were going to give the age pension to anyone who survived”. He says the pension rate was then £26 a year ­because that’s all the government could afford.
“There was no other scientific calculation involved. Down the years governments have made adjustments on whether they need to win an election, but they have never done an economic study to see what it really costs a ­pensioner to live.” Compton says many pensioners are ­giving up their phones and their computers because they can’t afford the $40 monthly bill – “so we are entering an age of technology where pensioners are going to be cut off from essential medical services”.
For the past year, Compton’s not-for-profit group the Longevity Innovation Hub, along with Australia’s oldest charity, the Benevolent Society, and the research think tank Per Capita, have been researching the needs of ­pensioners, holding focus groups and public meetings around the country. His research shows the need for “an independent tribunal set up by an act of Parliament that takes the whole pension out of the budget and out of polit­ical and election places”. Parliamentarians, he says, have a similar tribunal to ­decide their own salaries and never question the findings. Making the pension adequate and fair, he says, would cost the Federal Government $2 billion, but it could save $8 billion a year by cutting out middle-class welfare and negative gearing. Even if that meant a ­decline in the value of the home at Aspley, about 13km north of Brisbane’s CBD, where he and his wife Helen, 78, live, Compton says it’s a bullet he’ll take for the team.
We’re sitting in the study of that neat, lowset Aspley home two days after Compton’s speech. He’s behind the desk where, with a tumbler of good Scotch beside him and one finger working tirelessly, he tapped out a ­biography of his hero, the Reverend John Flynn. He wrote The Man on the Twenty Dollar Notes while winding down from a schedule that includes fighting for the pensioners, consulting on an inland railway from Melbourne to Darwin, writing regularly on his blog, tweeting voraciously under the handle @EVERALDATLARGE, advising on the cattle business, and raising funds for the Uniting Church in Aspley, where he and Helen are both elders.

Already on the day Everald talks to The Courier-Mail, he has had breakfast in Brisbane with Cloncurry cattleman Don McDonald, whose properties cover a land mass bigger than Belgium, and who is backing the inland railway. He ­followed that with a public meeting with pensioners at Mt Gravatt, in Brisbane’s south, hosted by the State Member for Mansfield, Ian Walker. Then it was lunch with a ­researcher to discuss affordable housing.
Helen is constantly amazed at her husband’s workload but Compton swears Flynn’s spirit is beside him, urging him to fight for disadvantaged Australians.
“Flynn was always a hero from my earliest childhood memories,” he says. “My mother took me to Sunday school at age three and I’ve been going to church ever since.”
Compton was born in Toowoomba and grew up in the logging villages of Linville and Monsildale in the Brisbane Valley. When the local mill closed, his father, Herbert, moved the family to Toowoomba for work at the KR smallgoods factory.
Herbert was descended from a British convict and Compton’s mother, Thelma, was the granddaughter of a ­Lutheran missionary sent from Germany with the charter to “remove sin from the continent of Australia”. John Flynn became Compton’s idol and exemplar.
“The sheer scope of what he achieved is staggering,” he says. “Back in 1912 the Presbyterian Church said to him, ‘we are going to make you the head of the Australian Inland Mission to look after the bush’ – which was 80 per cent of the continent. They thought he was going to build churches but he went out to spread the word by building a mantle of safety. He built hospitals, started the Flying Doctors and School of the Air. He was a true nation-builder and we don’t have nation-builders like him any more.”
Compton says writing the book kept his brain ­constantly firing. “I believe someone who remains active like me will live five years longer,” he says. “The more ­people who keep working into their later years means less money the government has to find for pensions. And the longer a person works, the more money is going into their super fund so they have a better life.
“I’m on a board of directors of a cattle company that I have a minor interest in. All the others on the board are 40, and I’m almost 85. They keep referring to my experience, and that situation should be replicated all over Australia. Every company with young turks should have an old guy on the board, provided they are willing to learn new ways.”

At the National Press Club, Jo Toohey, chief executive of the Benevolent Society, follows Compton to the stage and tells the audience that for many pensioners, the daily challenges of medical bills, paying rent or hiring tradespeople are “hugely amplified”.
“This has an enormous effect on their health and wellbeing.” Out of their pension, she says – a maximum basic rate of $797.90 a fortnight for a single person and $1203 for couples – they have to pay the basics first, so even a dental visit becomes “an extraordinary event”. Australia’s minimum wage is nearly double the age ­pension. The lowest-paid Member of Parliament receives almost 10 times the amount. “The poverty line in Australia is $851 a fortnight,” Toohey says. “If you’re a single person receiving the age pension without any rent assistance ­because you own your own home – which is quite possibly falling down around you – then your living income is $56 below the poverty line. That’s one-third of age pensioners.”
Many pensioners, she says, switch off their hot water for months because they can’t afford the electricity. “We are a rich country, the fifth-richest in the world (according to OECD wealth-distribution figures) yet we allow a third of our pensioners to live at or below the ­poverty line.”
Compton watches his confederate speak. He has the look of a general commanding troops in attack.
John Flynn knew how to build partnerships with people who could help him, Compton says. He had Hudson Fysh, the founder of Qantas, and fundraisers such as cattleman Sidney Kidman, farm machinery manufacturer H. V. McKay, and author Jeannie Gunn.
Compton started his partnership with Helen when he was 25 and president of the Presbyterian Fellowship for Brisbane. He was at a church camp at Alexandra Headland on the Sunshine Coast. He made a speech to farewell a missionary heading to Vanuatu, cracked a joke and saw a girl in the crowd smile at the remark.
That was 60 years ago. They have four children – Wendy, 57, a high-school teacher in Brisbane; Robyn, 55, a dietitian in Melbourne; Paul, 52, a banker in London, and Lyndel, 49, a cancer nurse at Swindon, also in England. Each of his four children has two of his or her own.
Compton worked at the smallgoods factory, then the Commonwealth Bank in Toowoomba, and studied at night to become an accountant. When he was 24 he heard that the Presbyterian Church was looking for a fundraiser to help build St Andrew’s War Memorial Hospital on Wickham Terrace in inner Brisbane’s Spring Hill.

He was so successful at tapping wealthy old Scotsmen on the shoulder that he soon set up his own fundraising company, which became Everald Compton International. He ran it for 40 years, establishing offices in Brisbane, Wellington in New Zealand, Johannesburg, Vancouver and London. He raised money for politicians across the spectrum – Gough Whitlam, John Howard, Bob Hawke and Joh Bjelke-Petersen. He met Joh’s future wife, Flo, when she was Florence Gilmour and teaching bible classes at St Andrew’s on Creek St, in Brisbane’s CBD. He ran campaigns for the restoration of English cathedrals – at Ely, Worcester, ­Gloucester, Winchester and Portsmouth – and raised money for South Africa’s Progressive Federal Party, which eventually helped to free Nelson Mandela.
All along Compton wanted to help a group in Australia he saw as being especially needy and in 1976 was one of the founders of National Seniors Australia, which boasts 250,000 members.
Since then, he has lobbied prime ministers for a better deal for older Australians and built three retirement ­villages – Compton Gardens at Aspley, Comptons at Caboolture, and Brookland Village at southside Sunnybank.
In 2009 he negotiated with then-federal treasurer Wayne Swan, his local member, an increase to the single pension of about $33, but he says much more is needed now to provide the elderly with a decent standard of living.
Compton gives a series of media interviews after his address to the National Press Club and talks over his ideas with Labor powerbroker Anthony Albanese. He ends the night tweeting: “Quiet scotch after 11 hours with #Pension Study Team … A small step towards justice for pensioners”.
Back at home with Helen in Aspley, he’s preparing for an open day at the nearby Bald Hills mosque to strengthen ties with his neighbourhood’s Muslim community. It is a rapidly changing world. He recently tweeted: “As committed Elder of my #Church can I say we have no right to say a word re #samesexmarriage in light of our infamous record on #childabuse”.
He has little faith in the present government, saying that he is “terribly disappointed” with Malcolm Turnbull. “I worked with Malcolm during the Republican movement in 1999. He was arrogant then, but decisive. He’d make snap decisions and you couldn’t contest them. He alienated so many people. But as Prime Minister, he is now so indecisive.”

Compton says the first Federal Budget he heard was delivered by Harold Holt more than half a century ago and the government’s funding for pensioners has not improved since then.
He has dealt with every prime minister since Menzies. “I had a fair bit to do with Whitlam,” he says. “He was an enormously impressive personality – the problem was he would imagine these great things but couldn’t get them done. He had some dreadful hillbillies with him like Jim Cairns and Rex Connor, who dragged him down. Malcolm Fraser was a very ordinary prime minister, and Bob Hawke was the best negotiator I’d met until Julia Gillard.
“Bob had a marvellous ability to be everybody’s friend. Paul Keating had the best economic brain but also an ability to make people dislike him. His ideas – such as compulsory superannuation – were brilliant.
“John Howard was probably the best grassroots pol­itician I dealt with. Old John could smell trouble coming a mile away and the Howard era was the most prosperous in my lifetime. We had 11 good years with him at the helm.”
Compton says he has “a very low opinion of Kevin Rudd” and cheered his downfall. “You never knew what he was going to do next. He was one of the most intelligent blokes I’ve dealt with but he couldn’t deal with people.”
Julia Gillard, he says, had a poor public image, like an old schoolmarm, “but one on one she was superb – a great negotiator. She had an attractive personality, which didn’t come through to the public”.
Tony Abbott, he says, was “totally out of his depth … a very rigid thinker driven by religion and hard-right ­ideology” – and he says Turnbull is only surviving because there is no natural successor.
Compton says the present Federal Government must do more for the growing population of ageing Australians. “By 2050 there will be 50,000 Australians over 100,” he says, “and the largest population group in Australia will be aged 85-100. The Government seems totally oblivious. Turnbull only has a Minister for Aged Care – that represents only about one per cent of the ageing question.”
The clock on Compton’s wall chimes and reminds him of more meetings he has scheduled.
When he gets a chance to relax with a smoky, peaty ­single-malt Scotch, he’s working on a new book about Australia’s Federation. He says it is “staggeringly stupid” that such a wealthy country as Australia still treats its oldest ­citizens so poorly.
Last week he told his audience in Canberra: “The Government hopes that by three o’clock this afternoon everyone will have forgotten about this, and I just want to let them know that in whatever short years I may have left on this planet, I’m going to relentlessly pursue them. We’ve come to the point in the history of Australia where the ­pension has to come out of politics and enter the area of human justice.
“As Gough Whitlam would have said if he were up here: ‘It’s time’.”

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This entry was posted in Community and Values, Everald Posts 2016, Funding and Finance, Government, Seniors, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Federal Government must do more for growing population of ageing Australians

  1. Geoff Blogg says:

    Hi Everald,
    As always a detailed thought provoking thrust on behalf of us pensioners – who knows maybe one day they will take some action to restore equity for us and I know that you will be in the forefront of the battle charge taking it up to them!
    In the meantime I intend to be among the 50,000 you mentioned will be 100 years old in 2050. I am a prime candidate having been born in 1947.
    Keep up the good fight Everald – we are all with you and greatly appreciate your continued struggle on behalf of us all.
    Looking forward to reading your next book on Federation when it is available

    Regards,

    Geoff Blogg

  2. Kevin C Kingswell says:

    Dear Everald and All.
    Couldn’t agree more with most of the comments listed above.
    Particularly re a political party advocating for the rights of older Australians.

    I will be 77 next month and apart from the sheer economic necessity to keep on working as a Supply Teaching, after being seriously defrauded in a house purchase, and by unscrupulous tradesmen, I struggle with subtle but rampant age discrimination to be a loving, but firm pioneer in proven methods in the teaching of school mathematics and science.

    Perhaps part of the lack of progress in the challenge to get justice for aged pensioners is the issue I constantly have in my chosen vocation—there are just so many of our younger generations who appear to have only limited, genuine capacity for empathy with older, wiser heads and hearts.
    In a few words, THEY SIMPLY DON’T GET IT—EVER !

    And I must confess that I have no easy solution, for the issue appears to be a spiritual one, at a time when so many Australians appear to be drowning in materialism—HOW WE NEED OUR OWN, HOME-GROWN VERSION OF THE MINIMALISTS OF THE USA !!

    In conclusion, in 2015 I was part of a local group desperately trying to get the previous Fraser Coast Regional Council to honour the legislated principles of local government in Queensland, and to adopt the standard of …”CARING WITH INTEGRITY”… .
    Our group failed miserably, BUT now the new State Government is currently winding up an investigation into that Council’s activities, but we are fearful that its findings will …’never see the light of day’… .
    PERHAPS A JOINT INVESTIGATION BY ABC “FOUR CORNERS” AND FAIRFAX PRESS, IN 2017, COULD LOOK AT THE PLIGHT OF OLDER CITIZENS IN QUEENSLAND, AS A EXEMPLAR OF HOW TOUGH WE ARE ‘DOING IT’, TO THE EXTENT THAT SOME OF US ARE LITERALLY BEING RATED OUT OF OUR HOMES.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this ‘offering’.

    With kind regards to you all,
    Kevin C KIngswell.

  3. Brian Peat says:

    Hi. Well done keep up the great work and please let me know what else I can do to assist. I have passed on your report to many people who I know and especially Pauling Hansen and politicians around Sunshine Coast and Townsville.
    Cheers
    Brian

  4. Allan Walter Cooper says:

    Yes mate read the article ,keep up the good work ,may be we should have you in place of Malcolm T. as I agree with you he does not appear to be a great decision maker.(bring back Paul K} Have to get together sometime for that lunch ,We seem to be supporting the medical fraternity at present so will get back to you when all is squared away. Unfortunately Fay is a suspect for alzheimer disease, which has put the cat among the pigeons as far a we are concerned. She has had tests but they are not conclusive to date and she is on medication to slow down the process ,with more tests later on in the year. Old age is a curse but don’t like the alternative. Will catch up Regards Co

  5. Liz Cooke says:

    Whilst I agree that many pensioners, particularly those with no assets are doing it tough, I think that anyone on a newstart allowance is doing it tougher. I think people are beginning to realise that we baby boomers have been incredibly lucky but we need to do something differently if those who follow us are going to have at least the same opportunities as we have had. I think we need to broaden the debate so that we look at how to develop a society where all people are valued. We are far too judgemental of other people and not accepting enough of difference. We ask how can I advance myself and not how can everyone advance.

  6. RAY DANAHER says:

    I REALLY LIKE THE IDEA OF A “AGED” PENSION JUSTICE PARTY – WHERE I AM, A TWENTY SOMETHING YEAR OLD INDIGENOUS WOMAN WITH FOUR CHILDREN ON A BUS RECENTLY REMARKED THAT SHE WAS RECEIVING THE PENSION – THANK YOU

  7. Anonymous says:

    Everald,hello you great Warlord, Thank Heavens for You! Missed your Press Club, must see.Getting slowly closer to about 40 modest homes for Non Super.eg 1 couple 77/78 being slugged 764Dollars a ft rent…more than her income.Lots Desperate People out there! ME Included! So far lots help but NO Dollars .Reg. Dev. Knocked me back then most Insultingly sent a Brochure Full Colour telling of their WONDERFUL work! Must have cost More than woould help me,just to PRODUCE!!! Lovely to see you TAKING on THE OH SO SMALL, BIG GUYS ta! Gabrielle. MI mini Mansions Australia AND MI MOBILE mini Mansions Australia……

  8. michael smythe says:

    If everyone of pension age and approaching pension age voted in the Senate for a Pension Justice Party together with sympathisers, there should be a good chance of two or three senators elected. I’m sceptical that a non-political approach will work. Pensioners need to get some political clout if there are to be any meaningful improvements in the age pension, in my view.

  9. Sue-Ellen Deacon says:

    He should have been a prime minister. Its not too late. Great read as always. Thanks Everald.

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